14.11.2016
 

SIGHT&SOUND MENTIONED A FILM FROM THE KOLO DZYGY SERIES

The reputable film magazine Sight & Sound called Oleksandr Dovzhenko’s silent film Arsenal (1929) from the KOLO DZYGY series of cinematic performances one of the most thrilling films showed at this year’s Cambridge Film Festival. 

 

It is said in the festival’s review published on the magazine’s site.

 

“Oleksandr Dovzhenko was responsible for one of the most thrilling silents of the festival, Arsenal (1928), a story of the Russian revolution, newly restored and with a terrifically intense soundtrack from Bronnt Industries Kapital. One of the highlights of last year’s Cambridge Film Festival was Victor Sjöström’s The Wind, from the same year, made in Hollywood just as the talkies were taking over and just imaginable as a talkie itself. Moving at montage speed from the realistically reconstructed, sometimes apparently shot handheld, to the flamboyantly symbolic, it too is a film in ‘transfigured time’.”

 

Oleksandr Dovzhenko’s film Arsenal (1929) tells a story of a Bolshevik uprising at Kyiv factory “Arsenal”, suppressed by the forces of the Central Council. The film was shot at Odessa Film Factory of VUFKU with the camera of legendary cameraman Danyl Demutskyi and using the original sets made by Volodymyr Muller. The expressionist imagery, perfect camera work and original drama took the film far beyond the usual propaganda and made it one of the most important pieces of Ukrainian avant-garde cinema.

 

Let us remind you that multi-instrumentalist Guy Bartell, founder and the mastermind of the Bronnt Industries Kapital band, recently wrote a new soundtrack to another of Dovzhenko’s feature films, which premiered on April 2, 2015, in Kyiv at the opening of Knyzhkovyi Arsenal. The re-premier of the film was supported by British Council in Ukraine. 

 

Dovzhenko’s Arsenal with the new soundtrack from Guy Bartell became the 10th achievement in the KOLO DZYGY series of music cinematic performances initiated by Dovzhenko Centre and serving to premiere restored Ukrainian silent films to the accompaniment of contemporary music.


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